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B.S. in Actuarial Science

Otterbein University Course Catalogs

2011-2012 Graduate Catalog 
    
    Nov 13, 2019  
2011-2012 Graduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

Important Academic Policies and Procedures


Academic Calendar
Fall and Spring Semesters
January Term
Summer Term

Academic and Enrollment Standards
General Admission Requirements
Academic Standing (requirements for continued enrollment)
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)
Program-Specific Policies
Undergraduate Course Policy
Plagiarism, Cheating and Dishonesty
Leave of Absence/Change of Catalog Year
Program Completion: Time Limit
Program Completion: Capstone Committees

Academic Support
Courtright Memorial Library
Academic Advising
Academic Support Center (and tutoring)
Center for Career Planning
Disability Services

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
FERPA

Grading System
Grade Symbols
In-Progress (IP) Grades
Grade Discrepancies (grade changes)
Transcript of Academic Work

Graduation
Applying for a Degree
Commencement

Grievance Procedure
Academic Appeals (Academic Council)

Registration Policies
Auditing Courses
Change of Schedule: add one or more classes
Change of Schedule: drop one or more classes but not all
Change of Schedule: drop (total withdrawal from) all classes
Enrollment Status Definition (full-time; half-time)
Prerequisites/Corequisites
Registration Timetable and Priority

Academic Calendar

Fall and Spring Semesters
The academic year consists of two semesters and an optional term in January. The semesters are 16 weeks in length: 14 weeks of instruction with the remaining time consisting of breaks, holidays and an examination period.

January Term
January Term offers students an opportunity to concentrate on a single course not typically offered during a regular semester, to engage in a research project, or to participate in a travel course.

Summer Term
For students who wish to accelerate their studies, Otterbein offers a Summer Term beginning in late May and ending in mid- August. Courses vary in length, but most are held over either a 6-week or a 12-week period. Summer term course offerings are announced around February 1 at which time registration opens.

Academic and Enrollment Standards

General Admission Requirements
Admission to Master’s and Post-Master’s programs at Otterbein University is open to graduates from institutions of higher education that are fully accredited by the appropriate regional accrediting agencies. While each program has its own admission criteria (approved by the University Graduate Committee), all programs require that candidates give evidence of the intellectual, academic and personal abilities to succeed in graduate studies. Admission shall not be denied on the basis of race, religion, age, sex, color, disability, sexual orientation, national/ethnic origin, political affiliation, marital or veteran status. If a student feels that a negative admission decision has been arrived at in a prejudiced or capricious manner, he or she may appeal to the Dean of the Graduate School. After meeting with the Graduate Dean, a student can request that Appeals Council consider the appeal. The Council hears appeals brought from other councils and committees and has final authority in many cases involving violation of university rules. After consideration by Appeals Council, a student may appeal the decision to the President of the University.

A Graduate School representative serves on each of the departmental admission committees. All admission decisions are reported in writing to the Graduate School.

Academic Standing (requirements for continued enrollment)
Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 (B) cumulative average. Students will be placed on academic probation when the overall GPA falls below 3.0. If a student’s GPA for a semester falls below a 3.00, a review by the Graduate School office will be conducted and a decision regarding status will be made. Written notice of academic probation will be sent to students and their advisors. A student may be on probation only once during the program of study. A probationary period consists of up two registered academic terms. Students must raise their GPA to 3.0 or above during the next two semesters of enrollment in required or elective courses. If the cumulative GPA falls below 3.00 a second time, the student will be dismissed from the program.

Grades of B-, C+, and C, while acceptable in meeting graduate degree requirements in some programs, are considered “marginal progress” outcomes. Any such outcome, or a GPA that falls below 3.0, or a Satisfactory Academic Progress rate that falls below expectations, warrants an academic advising conversation between the advisor and student, and possibly with the program chair or the Dean of Graduate Programs. In some cases, students earning a marginal progress in selected courses may be required to repeat and achieve a grade of satisfactory progress in these select courses to continue in the program of study.

Through the advising process, the University may direct the student to improve graduate-level academic skills (e.g., through a formal study of writing or use of other academic support resources), to take a reduced academic load or to take other steps to promote academic success.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)
Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) must be maintained in order to remain eligible for Federal Aid consideration. The Financial Aid Office evaluates SAP after the completion of each academic period (Summer, Fall and Spring). All terms of enrollment, including Summer, must be considered in the determination of SAP (even periods in which the student did not receive federal student aid funds must be counted).

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) towards a degree is determined by three tests:

  1. Academic Standing, (the appropriate GPA based upon credit hours earned; see Academic Standing in the Important Academic Policies and Procedures section of this catalog); and
  2. A student’s successful completion of credit hours attempted; and
  3. The completion of one’s degree within a reasonable time period.

Credit Hours Attempted versus Hours Earned: To maintain eligibility for federal student financial assistance, a student must successfully complete two-thirds (67%) of the credit hours attempted. Any course with a grade of “F” (failing), “W” (withdrawal), or “IP” (in progress) on the student’s academic transcript is considered an unsuccessful completed of hours attempted. (Once the “IP” has been completed, the grade will stand as either successful or unsuccessful completion as mandated by the Federal Government.)

Degree Completion: In addition to completing two-thirds of the credit hours attempted, a student must also complete his/her academic program within a reasonable timeframe, not to exceed 150% of the published length of the program—a student must meet all graduation requirements by the time the 192nd semester hour has been attempted. All periods of attendance are counted towards the maximum timeframe.

Since Academic Standing and Satisfactory Academic Progress are interrelated, a student may meet an adequate Academic Standing level (higher than a 2.0 cumulative GPA, for example), but not meet Satisfactory Academic Progress standards. If the student has not successfully completed enough classes (those classes with a “D” or above on the academic transcript) to meet the two-thirds (67%) earned hour rate, (s)he would not be making SAP for federal financial aid purposes.

Graduate students are considered to be making satisfactory academic progress for purposes of financial aid eligibility only if they are in good academic standing with Otterbein.

The first time a student fails Satisfactory Academic Progress they will be placed on warning. A student on warning status may receive one term of financial aid. If a student on warning fails Satisfactory Academic Progress they may appeal his/her Satisfactory Academic Progress and possibly received one term of federal aid on probation. The SAP Appeal Form may be used for this purpose and is available in the Financial Aid Office or through the website in the forms section. Satisfactory Academic Progress is administered by the Office for Financial Aid 614-823-1502.

Program-Specific Policies
In addition to the University academic standing policy outlined above, some programs may have grade policies that must also be satisfied in order to continue the program. Please refer to your program’s section of this catalog for any additional academic or grade specific requirements.

Undergraduate Course Policy
Students enrolled in undergraduate classes are required to maintain a cumulative undergraduate grade point average as described in the undergraduate catalog in order to be in good academic standing. Please refer to the Academic Good Standing portion of the undergraduate catalog.

Plagiarism, Cheating and Dishonesty
It is necessary to ascertain with accuracy an individual’s strengths and weaknesses in order to prepare a proper academic program for students and to evaluate their work. Thus, the “high standard of personal integrity” in the classroom means that an individual will not receive credit for work which is not his or her own.

In the taking of examinations, any attempt to receive assistance from persons, papers, or printed materials without the permission of the faculty member constitutes dishonesty. This definition applies not only to activities within the examination room, but also any attempt to obtain beforehand copies of examination questions without the faculty member’s consent, including attempts to obtain them from students taking the exam at an earlier time during the year. In short, all such unauthorized activities constitute dishonesty. A student who willingly provides assistance not condoned by the University to another student is also in violation, whether or not the student providing the assistance has completed the examination.

In preparing essays, reports, and other out-of-class projects, any use of the words or ideas of someone else as though they were one’s own constitutes plagiarism. This definition applies to the use of both printed and unprinted sources, including the work of other students or faculty. To avoid plagiarism, all borrowed materials must be fully documented. Direct quotations, however short, must be placed in quotation marks or indented beyond the regular margins, and their sources must be clearly identified. Ideas or arguments not directly quoted but paraphrased must also be documented; merely altering the wording does not make their substance a student’s own work. Facts, formulas, and other types of information which are widely known and considered common knowledge in a field do not always require documentation, but a student may not falsely claim the independent derivation or observation of such materials, nor borrow without acknowledgment of someone else’s special arrangement or use of it. When in doubt, the student should consult a member of the faculty. If acceptable methods of documenting borrowed materials are not clear, the student is to consult beforehand with the faculty member who will receive the finished work.

The use of an identical or nearly identical piece of work to fulfill requirements in more than one course without the knowledge of the faculty members involved constitutes dishonesty. If a student wishes to prepare a single piece of work for more than one course, the written permission of both faculty members must be secured beforehand. If a student wishes to submit a revised version of an earlier piece of work, written permission must be secured beforehand and the earlier version must be submitted along with the final version. When in doubt, a student should check with the faculty member.

In addition to acts of plagiarism and cheating, acts of dishonesty include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Furnishing false information to any University official, faculty member or office.
  • Forgery, alteration or misuse of any University document, record or instrument of identification.
  • Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a judicial body.

A faculty member who suspects the student may have committed an act of academic dishonesty shall meet with the student before the date that grades are due for the semester during which the incident took place to determine if academic misconduct has occurred and, if necessary, impose an appropriate sanction. If the faculty member determines that the misconduct was minor, he/she may provide appropriate counseling and have the student revise or entirely re-do the assignment. For minor academic misconduct, the faculty member will send a memo to the student briefly describing the misconduct, the counseling provided, and any follow-up steps required of the student. The faculty member will place a copy of this memo in the student’s departmental file.

If the faculty member determines that the misconduct was significant; he/she will impose an appropriate penalty, such as lowering the grade or giving a “0” for the assignment. If the offense is sufficiently serious, the faculty member may determine that the student should receive an F for the course. The following policies apply:

  1. Within five business days of the meeting, the faculty member will inform the student in writing of the penalty to be imposed and of his/her right to appeal this decision.
  2. Within five business days of the meeting, the faculty member will send a memo to the department chair and the Graduate School Dean that describes the offense and the sanction imposed. The student shall also receive a copy of this memo.
  3. If a student decides to appeal this decision, he/she will have five business days to schedule a meeting with the department chair to present his/her case. The chair will inform the faculty member involved of the student’s decision, and afford him/her the opportunity to present any evidence he/she deems relevant. The student has the option of having his/her advisor attend this meeting. If the advisor is not available the student may arrange to have another faculty member attend.
  4. If the student disagrees with the decision of the chair regarding the appeal he/she may proceed through the established procedure for appealing a course grade.

If there is a second incident of significant academic misconduct, the Dean of the Graduate School shall (with the advice and consent of the Graduate Committee) appoint an ad hoc committee to consider the case within five business days. This committee shall include two graduate faculty members and one graduate student who do not have prior involvement with either incident and be chaired by the Dean. This committee will verify that appropriate due process was employed in regard to the two incidents of academic misconduct and determine an appropriate consequence. The committee may decide to suspend the student for a semester or a year or to permanently dismiss the student from the program. Within five business days of a decision by the ad hoc committee to suspend or dismiss him/her, the student may file an appeal to the University Appeals Council.

Leave of Absence/Change of Catalog Year
Students who interrupt their enrollment at Otterbein University or in an Otterbein University approved program for longer than 12 consecutive months must meet the requirements for graduation as published in the catalog at the time of re-enrollment.

Program Completion: Time Limit
After a student has been admitted to a graduate program, continuous progress toward completion of the degree is expected. The time limit for the completion of graduate course work is 5 years for the Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts in Teaching, and Master of Business Administration programs. The time limit is 6 years for the Master of Science in Nursing program and 3 years for the Post Masters in Nursing programs. The time limit is computed from the first date credit is recorded on the college transcript until the program curriculum requirements are completed. Extensions are only considered if there is adequate and unusual cause beyond the control of the student for failure to meet the time limit policy. Petitions requesting extension of the time limit must be submitted to the Graduate Program Director for the MAE, MAT, and MBA programs. Petitions requesting extension of the time limit for graduate Nursing programs must be submitted to the Department’s Curriculum Committee.

Consideration of petitions will take into account whether or not: 1) there is a reasonable plan for completion and 2) the individual’s knowledge and skills meet current program goals. If approved, an official letter that stipulates the terms of the extension will be sent to the student and his/her academic advisor, and a copy will be placed in the student’s file in the Graduate School office.

If a petition is denied, a student has the right to appeal the decision. After meeting with the Graduate Dean, a student can request that Appeals Council consider the appeal. The Council hears appeals brought from other councils and committees and has final authority in many cases involving violation of university rules. If deemed appropriate, after consideration by Appeals Council, a student may appeal the decision to the President of the University.

Program Completion: Capstone Committees
Graduate programs with a capstone requirement constitute committees to advise and evaluate final projects. Students should consult their advisor and their program’s student handbook for the specific function and composition of committees in their program. One individual on each capstone committee serves as the graduate program representative; the role of the representative is to ensure that all policies and procedures, approved by the University Graduate Committee and outlined in program handbooks, are followed. This individual must sign an official Capstone Approval Form before it is submitted to the Office of the Registrar and the Graduate School.

Academic Support

Courtright Memorial Library
The Courtright Memorial Library includes over 400,000 print and non-print materials to support the curricular and co-curricular needs of students, faculty and staff of Otterbein University. The library offers laptop computers, data projectors, digital cameras, digital camcorders and other equipment for checkout to the Otterbein University community. There are three computer labs located within the building and wireless connectivity is available throughout the library facility. The Otter Bean Café provides food, beverages, wireless connectivity and comfortable seating.

The library is a part of a consortium of 24 private colleges, called OPAL. OPAL provides a shared online catalog, circulation, reserve, and cataloging system. Membership in OPAL allows Otterbein to belong to the statewide consortium called OhioLINK, a consortium of 88 Ohio college and university libraries. OhioLINK offers access to more than 47.6 million library items statewide, more than 140 electronic research databases and over 12,000 electronic journals. All these resources can be accessed through the college network or internet providers from computer labs, homes, offices or dormitories. Through OhioLINK membership, students, faculty, and staff may request materials from other Ohio academic libraries, either electronically or by visiting that library. Any items not owned by another Ohio academic library can be obtained through resource sharing agreements via Interlibrary Loan. Membership in OhioLINK also provides access to a growing number of electronic resources, including indexes (such as Academic Search Complete, Business Source Complete, Lexis-Nexis, ERIC, Medline, and Cinahl), electronic journals and electronic books.

The library staff strives to provide the best service possible to help students, faculty, staff and community users find the information they require. Reference assistance is available both in the library and remotely. Please contact us by visiting the library, or by phone, email or instant messaging.

Information about the library is available at http://library.otterbein.edu.

Academic Advising
Students are assigned a faculty member as their academic advisor. The advising process is an ongoing series of consultations between the student and the advisor. This advisor will help the student with decisions concerning courses and class scheduling. Advising involves both the development and communication of accurate information regarding degree programs, courses, resources, academic policies/procedures and career opportunities intended to help students in achieving their educational goals. Both the advisee and the advisor share the responsibility of being active participants in the advising process. However, the student is responsible for making decisions regarding personal and educational goals and satisfying all graduation requirements.

Academic Support Center
The Academic Support Center provides a variety of academic support services. The Writing Center offers both drop-in hours and appointments for consultation on writing in any course. Students can also e-mail the Writing Center with short focused questions. The Center, staffed by students and professionals, is open to all students who want to develop and refine their writing skills. The Math Lab provides assistance with math homework or concept review. It is staffed by student tutors and faculty who are available for extended hours each day. Noncredit individualized assistance from the professional staff is offered in areas such as time management, exam preparation, effective reading techniques, note-taking, and math study skills. The Academic Support Center also facilitates special academic accommodations for students with disabilities. For nursing students with English as a second language, please refer to the Nursing Department Policy for extra time on examinations.

Center for Career Planning
The Center for Career Planning offers resources and services including academic and career exploration, job and internship search skill-building, and job search tools including resumes, cover letters, and mock interviews. Contact the Center for Career Planning at 614-823-1456 or visit us online at www.otterbein.edu/careerplanning.

Disability Services
Disability Services (DS) at Otterbein is charged with ensuring that all qualified students with disabilities have equal access to an education and to campus life. This access is provided to students through the provision of legally mandated (Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act) services, accommodations, and advocacy. DS provides services to students with obvious physical disabilities such as visual impairments, hearing impairments and mobility impairments as well as to students diagnosed with learning disabilities, Attention Deficit Disorder/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), medical diagnosis (Fibromyalgia, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) and psychiatric disorders. In order to receive accommodations, students must provide DS with appropriate documentation of their disability. Types of accommodations that students may receive can include exam accommodations, note taking assistance, books in alternative format, and priority registration. DS is located in room #2 on the second floor of the library in the Academic Support Center. For more information, contact 614-823-1618 or visit DS on the web at www.otterbein.edu/ASC/DS/index.asp.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with regard to educational records and requires that Otterbein annually notify students of these rights. Included are the right to (1) inspect and review the educational records, (2) seek to have the records amended to correct inaccurate or misleading information, etc., (3) have some control over disclosure of the records, (4) secure a copy of Otterbein’s entire compliance policy including the locations of all educational records and (5) file a complaint with the Department of Education concerning alleged institutional failure to comply with the Act.

The following items are considered “Directory Information” and may be released without the student’s permission. A student does, however, have the right to withhold disclosure of the “Directory Information” providing a written request for such is submitted to the Student Affairs Office by September 30 every year.

  • name
  • addresses - campus and/or home
  • telephone numbers - campus and/or home
  • e-mail address
  • designated year of student (freshman, sophomore, etc.)
  • Greek affiliation
  • picture
  • date and place of birth
  • major field of study
  • degrees and awards received while attending Otterbein University
  • participation in officially recognized activities and sports
  • dates of attendance at Otterbein University
  • enrollment status
  • most recent educational agency or institution attended by student
  • high school of student
  • weight and height of member of athletic teams

Questions or requests to obtain a copy of the University’s entire FERPA policy should be directed to the Student Affairs Office. Requests to view educational records must be made in writing and should be directed to each individual campus office since the University does not maintain records in a central filing location. Requests will be honored within seven days of receipt.

Grading System

Grade Symbols
Graduate school is a process of academic exploration reserved for students who are committed to the high level of work demanded by a master’s degree program. Graduate students are, therefore, held to a higher standard of achievement than undergraduate students. In order to reflect the minimum levels of achievement necessary to award a graduate degree, the grading scales are considerably different than those applied to undergraduates. Specifically, for graduate courses, “A” level work is exemplary, “B” level work is satisfactory, and “B-” or below work does not meet expectations. Grading policies specific to each program are described in the online graduate catalog.

Each student can access his/her grades at the end of the term online via Self-Service Banner at www.otterbein.edu. A permanent transcript of all course work attempted and grades earned is maintained by the Office of the Registrar.

The following grades from letter-graded courses are included in the calculation of the grade point average (GPA). The numeric equivalents to the letter grades are displayed with the % symbol.

A 4.0 100-93% exceptional
A- 3.7 92-90% excellent
B+ 3.3 89-87% above average
B 3.0 86-83% above average
B- 2.7 82-80% above average
C+ 2.3 79-77% average
C 2.0 76-73% average
C- 1.7 72-70% below average
D+ 1.3 69-67% below average
D 1.0 66-60% below average
F 0.0 under 60% failure

 
The following grades are not included in the calculation of the GPA:

AU audit
F failure from pass/fail graded course
IP coursework incomplete (in-progress); temporary condition
NR grade not reported by instructor; temporary condition
P pass from pass/fail graded course
R repeated course
T transfer credit from another institution
W withdrawal


In-Progress (IP) Grades
“IP” is the temporary symbol given when course requirements have not been met due to circumstances beyond the student’s control. An incomplete grade should only be considered when the majority of the work required for the course has already been finished. The pressures of a normal academic load or the desire to do extra work in the course are not sufficient reasons for granting an incomplete.

The amount of additional time permitted might be no more than a few days or weeks since it should be proportional to the student’s illness or absence, etc. while remaining fair to others who were enrolled in the course. The IP must be completed no later than the following applicable deadline or sooner if prescribed by the instructor: for Fall IP’s, the last day of the Spring classes; for January Term classes, the last day of Spring classes; for Spring and Summer IP’s, the last day of Fall classes.

Due to extraordinary circumstances, an IP completion deadline may be considered for extension. To receive consideration, the student (not the instructor) must submit a written request/rationale to the Dean of the Graduate School no later than the seventh Friday of the term the IP is due for completion.

It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to arrange for completion of the work, and it is the instructor’s responsibility to submit the final grade. If no grade is received, the default grade previously provided by the instructor will be assigned.

Grade Discrepancies (grade changes)
Grades submitted to the Office of the Registrar are considered final unless (1) evidence of an error can be presented, or (2) the student is convinced his or her academic performance was evaluated on other than an academic basis or in a prejudiced or capricious manner. Grades may not be changed by arranging to complete additional work or by meeting criteria not in accord with those applied to all other students enrolled in the course.

To appeal a grade, the student must consult with the instructor (or the department chairperson when the instructor is away from campus) no later than the following applicable deadline: for Fall and January Term grades, the end of Week Four of Spring Semester; for Spring and Summer grades, the end of Week Four of Fall Semester. Resolution and submission of the revised grade to the Office of the Registrar must occur by the end of those respective semesters. Signatures of both the instructor and the instructor’s department chairperson are required to change a grade.

When a grading issue cannot be resolved through discussions with the instructor or department chairperson, the student may present evidence in writing to the Dean of the Graduate School indicating an error, the prejudicial basis, or the capricious manner used in evaluating his or her performance. In all cases, this step must be taken no later than five business days beyond the applicable 4th week deadline indicated in the previous paragraph. The Dean shall consult with the student and instructor after which the appeal may be passed on to the Appeals Council for its consultation and judgment. The actual grade change, if deemed in order by the Appeals Council, shall be determined by the Dean of the Graduate School in consultation with the student and the instructor involved (or the applicable Department Chairperson if the instructor is unavailable).

Transcript of Academic Work
Copies of official transcripts may be obtained for a nominal fee from the Office of the Registrar. An official transcript cannot be provided when there is an outstanding bill or a loan in default. Requests are filled within five business days. Order forms are available on campus or on the Office of the Registrar’s website, www.otterbein.edu.

Graduation

Applying for a Degree
Degrees are granted at the end of Summer, Fall, January and Spring terms. Students planning to graduate must request a Graduation Application at the Office of the Registrar two semesters prior to the term in which the degree is to be completed. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of this requirement, to initiate the request and to sign/return the application on time.

Commencement
The Graduate commencement ceremony is held in May and all graduates (Summer, Fall, January and Spring) are invited to participate. To participate, a student must:

  • complete all academic degree requirements, and
  • submit a completed Graduation Application, and
  • submit any additional paperwork as required in the Graduation Application, and
  • meet all outstanding financial obligations.

Detailed information about the commencement ceremony is available at any time on the Office of the Registrar’s website, www.otterbein.edu.

Grievance Procedure

Academic Appeals (Academic Council)
Through the Academic Council, which is a standing committee of the University Senate, an avenue for appealing academic policies is provided all students. Details regarding the appeal process are available from the Office of Academic Affairs. Minutes of past Academic Council meetings are on file in the Library.

Registration Policies

Auditing Courses
The Graduate School permits students to audit classes. Currently matriculated students may obtain an audit approval form online; it is the student’s responsibility to contact the course instructor and obtain his or her signature on the form. Once the form is completed and signed by both the instructor and the student, the student must submit the form to the Graduate School. The instructor has the discretion to deny the audit request; the Office of the Registrar will determine whether there is room in the class and that necessary prerequisites are met. While no credit is given for auditing a course, a grade of AU will appear on the transcript record. An audit may not be substituted for a required class; the required class must be taken for credit. Auditing students are not permitted to take clinical classes, courses involving significant technology, etc.

If a non-matriculated student wishes to audit a graduate class, all of the above conditions, procedures and restrictions apply. A transcript (unofficial is sufficient) or a diploma copy showing receipt of a Bachelor’s degree must accompany the audit approval form

Change of Schedule: add one or more classes
For Fall and Spring Semesters, the deadline for adding a class that begins in the same semester is the second Friday of the semester. Deadlines for courses that are shorter than the usual 14 week semester (including Summer Term and January Term) are published on the Office of the Registrar’s website.

Change of Schedule: drop one or more classes but not all
Students who wish to drop one or more classes that began in the same semester but retain a partial schedule must follow these deadlines:

  • Friday of Week 5; the course will not be recorded on the student’s transcript
  • Friday of Week 9; a grade of W will be recorded on the student’s transcript

After Friday of Week 9, withdrawal is not permitted and whatever grade is assigned by the instructor will be recorded on the transcript.

Deadlines for courses that are shorter than the usual 14 week semester (including Summer Term and January Term) are published on the Office of the Registrar’s website.

Change of Schedule: drop (total withdraw from) all classes
Students who wish to withdraw from all classes that began in the same semester must officially withdraw from the University by completing a withdrawal form at the Office of the Registrar or faxing a letter requesting withdrawal to the Office of the Registrar 614-823-1009. The date of withdrawal is the date the notice is received by the Registrar. If a student never attends any classes or stops attending without officially withdrawing, the registration will not terminate. Grades will be assigned under the grading criteria used to evaluate all students in each course and the student will be responsible for all fees and tuition charges for the class or classes. Nonattendance and/or nonpayment of fees do not constitute official withdrawal.

It is the responsibility of the student to make certain that the written notice of withdrawal reaches the Office of the Registrar by these deadlines:

  • Friday of Week 5; the course will not be recorded on the student’s transcript
  • Friday of Week 9; a grade of W will be recorded on the student’s transcript

After Friday of Week 9, withdrawal is not permitted and whatever grade is assigned by the instructor will be recorded on the transcript.

Deadlines for courses that are shorter than the usual 14 week semester (including Summer Term and January Term) are published on the Office of the Registrar’s website.

Enrollment Status Definition (full-time; half-time)
Full-time graduate course load is defined as 6 semester hours. Half-time is defined as 3 semester hours. Graduate students will be charged a per-credit-hour rate for graduate level courses regardless of the number of hours carried. Graduate students enrolled at least half-time are eligible for financial aid.

Prerequisites/Corequisites
Prerequisites (prereq) or corequisites (coreq) are requirements which are judged necessary for the successful completion of a course. Students who register for a course without taking the prerequisite or corequisite are subject to being withdrawn from the course by the instructor or the Registrar.
Waiver of the prerequisites for a course is generally discouraged but may be done occasionally on a case-by-case basis. This waiver may be granted only by the instructor of the course after that instructor’s assessment of the specific student’s history and experiences. Prior to granting the waiver, the instructor must be reasonably assured that the student has had courses, background experiences, or abilities which would generally be equivalent to, or serve to negate the necessity of, the prerequisites. The instructor must also be reasonably assured that the student will not be at an educational disadvantage compared to students who have completed the prerequisites. Waiver of a prerequisite by the instructor does not, expressly or by implication, constitute a representation or assurance of the successful completion of the course. The student remains fully responsible for his/her performance in the course. It is the student’s responsibility to assure that a prerequisite has been met.

Registration Timetable and Priority
New students register for classes just prior to the term in which they enroll. Currently enrolled students typically register for the entire forthcoming academic year (Fall, January and Spring terms) during the preceding Spring. The University reserves the right to refuse registration to a student who is failing to make satisfactory progress toward his or her degree.