Javascript is currently not supported, or is disabled by this browser. Please enable Javascript for full functionality.

B.S. in Actuarial Science

Otterbein University Course Catalogs

2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    May 30, 2020  
2010-2011 Undergraduate Catalog [Archived Catalog]

The Academic Program



Degrees Offered

Top ^

The University offers the following degrees at the undergraduate level:

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
Bachelor of Science (B.S.)
Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)
Bachelor of Music (B.MUS.)
Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.E.)
Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.E.)
Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.)

In the programs at Otterbein University that offer both the BA and the BS degrees, the degrees have been defined as:

  1. The BA degrees are programs that are designed to provide a broad coverage of one field in the context of a comprehensive liberal arts education. BA degrees are characterized by breadth and flexibility (i.e. opportunities for electives outside the major). They are appropriate for students combining the study of their principal program with the study of other disciplines (e.g. the sciences, professional studies, art, humanities, or the social sciences).
  2. The BS degrees are programs that are specifically designed to prepare students for graduate and professional programs. BS degrees are characterized by specialization and depth and include significant quantitative components. They typically require advanced work within the discipline and supporting and/or interdisciplinary work in related disciplines. BS students may also be required to complete an independent research project through departmental, internship, honors, or distinction programs.

The University offers the following degrees at the graduate level:

Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)
Master of Arts in Education (M.A.E.)
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)
Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.)

Additional information regarding the Master’s degree programs is described in separate publications available upon request from the Graduate Programs Office.


The Liberal Arts Core

Top ^

All students at Otterbein University take a core of courses in the liberal arts. The largest piece in this core is the Integrative Studies (INST) program, which focuses on the theme of human nature. This program was originally called the Common Courses to emphasize that all of us need a shared base of knowledge so that we can join in the discussions of ideas and issues important to educated people. Through the Integrative Studies program, students take courses in the social sciences; the arts; the natural sciences; religion and philosophy; and literature and composition. Through the variety of disciplines integrated in the program, the college ensures that Otterbein graduates have a breadth of knowledge and experiences in different approaches to a common theme.

Otterbein also requires experience and knowledge in mathematics and in foreign languages. The requirements in these areas work together with the Integrative Studies program to ensure breadth in learning. Students are exposed to the importance of mathematics in building analytic and logical power, in understanding the physical world, and in coping with the quantitative and technical information which increasingly governs society. The study of a foreign language prepares students to participate more fully as citizens of an increasingly interconnected and interdependent world community and develops an awareness, understanding and appreciation of cultures other than their own. University academic foundation skills include writing, and the three-course writing sequence in the Integrative Studies program (INST 100/105/110, 270, and 300) is designed to ensure regular practice and development of formal writing skills in presentation and support of ideas. In addition, Otterbein has made the commitment to support the physical as well as the mental skills of its students, and requires three one-credit hour courses in Health and Physical Education.

During their senior year, candidates for all Bachelor’s degrees must meet the Senior Year Experience (SYE) requirement. The requirement is designed to allow students to bring together the learning gained in their majors and their liberal arts core courses. The SYE requirement can be met through a variety of choices; all provide closure for the four years of a liberal arts education and ensure the opportunity for personal and college assessment.

The Integrative Studies Program and Requirements

Candidates for all Bachelor’s degrees must complete the Integrative Studies Program requirements. The Integrative Studies Program builds self-knowledge as well as knowledge of the diversity of cultures, traditions, and points of view in the world. At each level in the program, the frame within which individuals see themselves widens and becomes both more complex and more inclusive. As a result, students going through the Integrative Studies Program gain a broad, general knowledge of the world they live in.

The program of courses in Integrative Studies consists of ten requirements (50 credit hours), which must be taken throughout the four years of undergraduate education, with some designed specifically for freshmen, some for sophomores, and some for juniors and seniors. At the freshman level, courses emphasize the individual and the context of society and history. Sophomores and juniors are asked to consider in depth the significance of their values, philosophy, and beliefs. At the junior and senior level, students then put their knowledge of themselves, their own traditions, and their own beliefs into the context of the arts and the sciences. Finally, students are expected to consider their knowledge and beliefs within the wider context beyond the Euro-American world and its variety of cultural forms and values. All the courses are linked by a common goal: to understand human nature and our place in the universe.

Freshman Requirements

Required/Choose one writing course.

 
 
 

Required/Choose one social science course.

 
 
 
 
 

Required social science course.

 

Sophomore Requirements

Optional/This natural science course and one upper level INST natural science course fulfill the INST Natural Sciences requirement.

 

Required/Choose one religion or philosophy course.

 
 

Required writing course.

 

Junior and Senior Requirements

Please note: Students must take the freshman and sophomore level requirements before enrolling in the junior and senior level requirements.

Required writing course.

 

Required/Choose one fine arts course.

 
 
 

Required/Choose two natural science courses.

 
 
 
 
 

Required/Choose one global thought course.

 
 
 
 
 

The Foreign Language Requirement

It is strongly recommended that students complete their foreign language requirement in the first year of enrollment. Students with strong background in a foreign language might be able to begin with the second or third course of foreign languages. To assist students in determining which is the appropriate course to register for, students should consult the website of the Department of Foreign Languages http://www.otterbein.edu/dept/foreignlang/. Students are encouraged to combine further language study with their majors.

For B.A. students:
Satisfactory completion of one of the following: French 110, German 110, Italian 110, Japanese 110, or Spanish 110. (Note: these courses have a 100-level prerequisite.)

For B.S. students:
Satisfactory completion of one of the following: French 120, German 120, Italian 120, Japanese 120, or Spanish 120. (Note: these courses have both 100-level and 110-level prerequisites.)

For B.F.A., B.M.E., B.S.E., and B.S.N. students:
No foreign language requirement.

For B.MUS. students:
10 hours of French, German, Italian, Japanese, or Spanish at 110-499 level.

The foreign language requirement may be satisfied through these means:

  1. Taking the appropriate foreign language course(s) at Otterbein University.
  2. Transferring equivalent foreign language courses from another college. To determine equivalencies to Otterbein foreign language courses, please consult the Otterbein Registrar’s website or contact the Chair of the Department of Foreign Languages. In addition, equivalent transfer credit for foreign languages other than those offered at Otterbein (e.g., Greek, Swahili, or Arabic) may be used.
  3. Receiving the appropriate score on the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) examination in French, German or Spanish. Students who earn a designated higher score on the CLEP examination will receive 5 credit hours.
  4. Receiving the appropriate score on Brigham Young University’s Foreign Language Achievement Tests (FLATS) examination. Students must arrange in advance with the Department of Foreign Languages to take this examination, which is available for 55 languages. All costs connected to the examination are paid by the individual student.
  5. Completing a foreign language AP exam with a score of 3 or better. Receiving a score of 3 would provide an exemption from the foreign language requirement. Students who receive a score of 4 or 5 would be exempt from the foreign language requirement and will receive credit for the appropriate Otterbein-equivalent course.
  6. International Students whose native language is not English and who have taken high school and/or college coursework in their native language may be exempt. Students who wish to claim this exemption must contact the Chair of the Department of Foreign Languages.

The Mathematics Requirement

For B.A. students:
Math 115 or 116 or 120 or 150 or PHIL 125

For B.S. students:
Math 120 (or Math 115 and 116), 170, and 180

For B.F.A. students:
not required

For B.M.E. students:
not required in the liberal arts core, but there is a math requirement in the major

For B.MUS. students:
not required

For B.S.E. students:
not required in the liberal arts core, but there is a math requirement in the major

For B.S.N. students:
not required in the liberal arts core, but there is a math requirement in the major

The Department of Mathematical Sciences administers a placement test for mathematics. Based on the results of this test, it is possible to place out of part of the B.S. mathematics requirement. The rest of the B.S. requirement, as well as the B.A. requirement, must be satisfied through college credit. It is also possible that the examination will indicate a student’s math skills need additional strengthening. This is achieved by taking one or two pre-college level courses which do not count toward graduation (ASC 080; Math 090). In addition, some majors require more than one college level mathematics course.

The Health and Physical Education Lifestyle Series Requirement

Candidates for all Bachelor’s degrees must complete one course from the HPES 101 series, one course from the HPES 102 series and one course from the HPES 103 series. Students who will be 23 years of age by the time they graduate and students enrolled in the Continuing Studies program are exempt from this requirement.

Each of the HPES courses (101, 102, 103) is repeatable to a maximum of 2 credits. Credits exceeding the limit will not count towards graduation.

The Senior Year Experience Requirement

Candidates for all Bachelor’s degrees must complete the Senior Year Experience (SYE). The Senior Year Experience is designed to teach and strengthen the skills and practice of synthesis; to ensure structure, content, and credit for the work of connecting learning across disciplinary boundaries; to provide a focal point and closure for the four years of a liberal arts education; and to provide a bridge among academic learning, professionalism and responsible citizenship. SYE courses and options expose students to significant contemporary social issues that challenge us as citizens; give tools for understanding and making ethical choices when faced with such issues; provide a curricular space in which to bring together the learning gained in majors and Integrative Studies courses; provide opportunities for working together on issues that require a wide range of disciplinary perspectives and expertise; and enable students to consider their roles as educated persons, professionals, and citizens. Students must have completed 135 credit hours and seven of 10 Integrative Studies courses before taking the SYE requirement. Some options may have additional prerequisites; check individual course descriptions. The SYE requirement must be taken in residence.

Students can meet their SYE requirement through 1) team-taught five-credit hour interdisciplinary SYE courses; 2) departmental offerings that include SYE components and have been approved by the SYE Committee; or 3) SYE offerings tied to off-campus, immersion, internship, or individualized experiences. Because the options meeting this requirement vary from year to year, they are listed annually on the SYE website: www.otterbein.edu/sye/.  Students should familiarize themselves with these materials and meet with their advisor before selecting their SYE choice.


The Major

Top ^

To complement the broadening aspects of the liberal arts and elective components of the baccalaureate degree, students must also pursue a primary concentration in depth, called a major. The major is designed to provide an understanding of the theories, perspectives, and practices related to a particular body of knowledge. Otterbein offers disciplinary and interdisciplinary majors. A disciplinary major requires students to take coursework from one academic discipline and may require some supporting courses drawn from other academic disciplines. An interdisciplinary major requires students to take a balanced selection of courses from at least two academic disciplines. The requirements for the majors programs differ from department to department, and some include required grade point averages as well as specific course requirements. All majors require at least 1 5 quarter hours in residence and all of these hours must be at the 300/400 course level. Selecting a major also means selecting the particular degree you receive upon graduation.

Some students select a major directly identified with an occupation. Others choose one of the University’s liberal arts majors that traditionally lead to employment in diverse areas. For other students the choice of major is directed at preparation for graduate school.

Many students entering college are undecided about a major. During their early quarters of enrollment at Otterbein, these students typically schedule core courses and experiment by enrolling in courses in majors in which they have a general interest. Faculty advisors are available to help students begin the process of selecting a major and begin thinking about a career.

Majors Offered

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Majors

Accounting
Accounting, Public
Art
Athletic Training
Biochemistry
Broadcasting
Business Administration
Chemistry
Computer Science
Economics
English
Environmental Science
Equine Health Technology
Equine Business and Facility Management
Equine Science Preveterinary and Pregraduate Studies
French
Health Education
Health Promotion and Fitness
History
Individualized
International Studies
Journalism
Life Science
Mathematics
Molecular Biology
Music
Organizational Communication
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Public Relations
Religion
Sociology
Spanish
Speech Communication
Sport Management
Theatre

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Majors in Liberal Studies

(open to students enrolled in the Continuing Studies Program, see Continuing Studies )

Liberal Studies in Business Administration
Liberal Studies in Business Psychology
Liberal Studies in Human Resources Management
Liberal Studies in Leadership
Liberal Studies in Management and Leadership
Liberal Studies in Organizational Communication

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Majors

Accounting
Accounting, Public
Actuarial Science
Allied Health
Athletic Training
Biochemistry
Business Administration
Chemistry
Computer Science
Economics
Environmental Science
Equine Business and Facility Management
Equine Science Preveterinary and Pregraduate Studies
Individualized
Life Science
Mathematics
Molecular Biology
Physical Science
Physics
Psychology

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Majors

Acting
Design/Technology
Musical Theatre
Musical Theatre with Dance Concentration

Bachelor of Music (B.MUS.)

Performance

Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.E.) Majors

Music Education

Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.E.) Majors

Early Childhood Education
Middle Childhood Education
(Students planning to teach at the secondary level seek the B.A. or B.S. degree.)

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) Majors

Nursing

Individualized Major (B.A. or B.S.)

To provide flexibility in college requirements for a student who has set a goal which does not fit within the present requirements of the department major-elective system, the opportunity to propose an individualized major is offered under the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Degree. The student must have at least 75 quarter hours of work remaining toward the 180-quarter-hour degree requirement at the time of entry into the program. The program, which must receive the approval of the Curriculum Committee*, requires:

  1. a clear statement of the objective to be reached by the program
  2. a course-by-course, quarter-by-quarter schedule showing all courses in the major and the liberal arts core leading to the degree
  3. a maximum of 75 quarter hours for the approved program, to be determined by the Curriculum Committee in consultation with the advisor. A copy of the approved program must be signed by the Curriculum Committee Chairperson and kept on file in the Registrar’s Office
  4. written recommendations from the faculty advisor and a knowledgeable faculty member from another department, indicating their approval of the plan and their assurance that the liberal arts emphasis of the College is maintained.
  5. the names of two specialists from outside the Otterbein community who would be in a position to pass judgment on the program.

*Once the program is approved, any forthcoming substitutions and/or waivers must be approved by the Curriculum Committee.

Second Major

With careful planning, it may be possible to earn a second major during the same period the first major is being earned. The decision should be made early, and students are strongly encouraged to arrange for advising in both academic disciplines.


The Minor

Top ^

Students may elect to complete a minor as well as a major when they are interested in pursuing coursework in a second field. A minor consists of 20 or more quarter hours of coursework in one field of study or in an interdisciplinary group of courses. A maximum of 10 quarter hours of independent study may be counted toward the minor. The minor requires at least five quarter hours in residence and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0.

Minors Offered

Accounting
Art
Art History
Arts Administration                                                                                                                                                                                           Audio Production*
Black Studies
Broadcasting
Business Administration
Chemistry
Coaching
Computer Science
Dance
Economics
Earth Science
English
Environmental Studies
Equine Studies
French
German
Health Education
History
Individualized
Japanese
Journalism Publication and On-Line Design
Journalism Writing
Language and Culture of the Deaf Community
Legal Studies
Life Science
Mathematics
Music
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science
Public Relations
Psychology
Religion
Sociology
Spanish
Speech Communication
Women’s Studies
* open to BA Music majors only

Individualized Minor

The individualized minor is designed to provide flexibility for students to pursue a secondary academic goal that does not fit within the structure of available minors. A student who proposes such an individualized minor must have at least 60 quarter hours of work remaining toward the 180-quarter-hour degree requirement at the time of entry into the program. The program, which must receive the approval of the Curriculum Committee,* requires:

  1. a clear statement of the objective to be reached by the program
  2. a course-by-course, quarter-by-quarter schedule leading to the minor and description of how courses meet the objective in part a.
  3. a minimum of 30 quarter hours for the approved program, to be determined by the Curriculum Committee in consultation with the advisor. No more than 5 of the hours may be counted in another major or minor. A copy of the approved program must be signed by the Curriculum Committee Chairperson and kept on file in the Registrar’s Office.
  4. written recommendations from the faculty advisor of record and a knowledge able faculty member from a department involved in the minor indicating their approval of the plan and their assurance that the liberal arts emphasis of the College is maintained.

*Once the program is approved, any forthcoming substitutions and/or waivers must be approved by the Curriculum Committee.


Summary of Degree Requirements

Top ^

To graduate from Otterbein University, all students must complete the core of liberal arts requirements described below. In addition, all students must have a major and complete the requirements for that major program. While some majors’ requirements are extensive, most leave room for electives, courses students choose out of interest and a desire to explore new disciplinary areas. Students often use part of this elective opportunity to complete a minor, and some students complete a second major. In all programs except Public Accounting, students must earn a minimum of 180 quarter hours to graduate. Public Accounting majors must earn a minimum of 225 quarter hours to graduate.

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Degree Requirements

A candidate for the B.A. degree must complete the following:

  • all requirements in the major
  • the Integrative Studies program
  • French 110, German 110, Italian 110, Japanese 110 or Spanish 110 for all majors except Music; these courses have a 100-level prerequisite; for Music, must complete 10 hours at 110 level or above
  • at least one mathematics course (Math 115, 116, 120 or 150; or PHIL 125)
  • three HPES (101, 102 and 103) health and physical education lifestyle series courses unless exempt
  • the Senior Year Experience
  • at least 180 quarter hours (or 185 if MATH 090 was taken; or 190 if ASC 080 and MATH 090 were taken); Public Accounting majors must earn 225 quarter hours

In addition, a candidate must:

  • have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the major as well as overall
  • not complete more than 10 hours of independent study (390 course number) at the major level or 15 hours in all academic disciplines
  • request an Application for Degree from the Office of the Registrar at least two quarters prior to the quarter in which the degree is to be completed

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree Requirements

A candidate for the B.S. degree must complete the following:

  • all requirements in the major
  • the Integrative Studies program
  • French 120, German 120, Italian 120, Japanese 120 or Spanish 120; these courses have both 100-level and 110-level prerequisites
  • three mathematics courses (Math 120 [or Math 115 and 116], 170 and 180)
  • three HPES (101, 102 and 103) health and physical education lifestyle series courses unless exempt
  • the Senior Year Experience
  • at least 180 quarter hours (or 185 if MATH 090 was taken; or 190 if ASC 080 and MATH 090 were taken); Public Accounting majors must earn 225 quarter hours

In addition, a candidate must:

  • have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the major as well as overall
  • not complete more than 10 hours of independent study (390 course number) at the major level or 15 hours in all academic disciplines
  • request an Application for Degree from the Office of the Registrar at least two quarters prior to the quarter in which the degree is to be completed

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Degree Requirements

A candidate for the B.F.A. degree must complete the following:

  • all requirements in the major
  • the Integrative Studies program
  • three HPES (101, 102 and 103) health and physical education lifestyle series courses unless exempt
  • the Senior Year Experience
  • at least 180 quarter hours, though closer to 200 hours are more likely

In addition, a candidate must:

  • have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the major as well as overall
  • not complete more than 10 hours of independent study (390 course number) at the major level or 15 hours in all academic disciplines
  • request an Application for Degree from the Office of the Registrar at least two quarters prior to the quarter in which the degree is to be completed

Bachelor of Music (B.MUS.) Degree Requirements

A candidate for the B.MUS. degree must complete the following:

  • all requirements in the major
  • Integrative Studies program
  • two levels of a foreign language (French, German, Japanese or Spanish 110 or higher)
  • three HPES (101, 102 and 103) health and physical education lifestyle series courses unless exempt
  • the Senior Year Experience
  • at least 180 quarter hours, though closer to 200 hours are more likely

In addition, a candidate must:

  • have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the major as well as overall
  • not complete more than 10 hours of independent study (390 course number) at the major level or 15 hours in all academic disciplines
  • request an Application for Degree from the Office of the Registrar at least 2 quarters prior to the quarter in which the degree is completed

Bachelor of Music Education (B.M.E.) Degree Requirements

A candidate for the B.M.E. degree must complete the following:

  • all requirements in the major
  • Integrative Studies program
  • three HPES (101, 102 and 103) health and physical education lifestyle series courses unless exempt
  • the Senior Year Experience
  • at least 180 quarter hours (or 185 if MATH 090 was taken; or 190 if ASC 080 and MATH 090 were taken) though closer to 200 hours are more likely

In addition, a candidate must:

  • have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the major as well as overall (to be certified to teach, must have 2.5 overall)
  • not complete more than 10 hours of independent study (390 course number) at the major level or 15 hours in all academic disciplines
  • request an Application for Degree from the Office of the Registrar at least two quarters prior to the quarter in which the degree is to be completed

Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.E.) Degree Requirements

A candidate for the B.S.E. degree must complete the following:

  • all requirements in the major
  • the Integrative Studies program
  • three HPES (101, 102 and 103) health and physical education lifestyle series courses unless exempt
  • the Senior Year Experience
  • at least 180 quarter hours (or 185 if MATH 090 was taken; or 190 if ASC 080 and MATH 090 were taken) though closer to 200 hours are more likely

In addition, a candidate must:

  • have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the major as well as overall (to be certified to teach, must have 2.5 overall)
  • not complete more than 10 hours of independent study (390 course number) at the major level or 15 hours in all academic disciplines
  • request an Application for Degree from the Office of the Registrar at least two quarters prior to the quarter in which the degree is to be completed

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (B.S.N.) Degree Requirements

A candidate for B.S.N. degree must complete the following:

  • all requirements in the major
  • the Integrative Studies program
  • three HPES (101, 102 and 103) health and physical education lifestyle series courses unless exempt
  • the Senior Year Experience
  • at least 1 80 quarter hours (or 185 if MATH 090 was taken; or 190 if ASC 080 and MATH 090 were taken) though closer to 200 hours are more likely

In addition, a candidate must:

  • have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 in the major as well as overall
  • earn a final grade of “C” or higher in all Nursing courses; Chemistry 110 and 220; Integrative Studies 130 and 100 or 105 or 110; and Life Science 108, 109, 206 and 312
  • not complete more than 10 hours of independent study (390 course number) at the major level or 15 hours in all academic disciplines
  • request an Application for Degree from the Office of the Registrar at least two quarters prior to the quarter in which the degree is to be completed.

Additional Requirements

Top ^

Hours Needed to Graduate

Candidates for all programs except Public Accounting must complete at least 180 quarter hours. Students who have taken Math 090 must complete at least 185 quarter hours, and those who have taken ASC 080 and Math 090 must complete at least 190 quarter hours. Public Accounting majors must complete at least 225 quarter hours.

Any difference between the minimum hours needed to graduate (180/185/190) and the hours earned through the Core Curriculum plus the major may be met by choosing electives, earning a minor, etc.

Residence Requirement

To meet the residence requirements for a Bachelor’s degree, a student must complete:

  1. at least 15 quarter hours in the major at the 300/400 course level in an Otterbein classroom 
  2. at least 5 quarter hours in the minor in an Otterbein classroom
  3. at least two Integrative Studies courses in an Otterbein classroom with at least one of these two courses at the 300/400 course level
  4. at least 60 overall quarter hours in an Otterbein classroom; ASC 080 and MATH 090 cannot be used to fulfill this requirement
  5. 30 of the final 45 quarter hours must be taken in an Otterbein classroom.

Interruption in Attendance/Catalog in Force

The degree requirements of the College in effect at the time of the student’s first enrollment are those which must be met for completion of a degree program. Subsequent changes in degree requirements may be substituted with the approval of the department chairperson or Academic Council, whichever is appropriate.

Students who interrupt their enrollment at Otterbein University or in an Otterbein University approved program for longer than 12 consecutive months must meet the requirements for graduation as published in the catalog at the time of re-enrollment.

In some instances, changes in departmental requirements must be applied to students who have already enrolled. In such instances, the new requirements will apply in a manner that will not require a student to carry more than a full-time load otherwise not required in any quarter and will not prolong the time required to complete the degree requirements. Department chairpersons have the authority to waive or provide substitute course work for departmental requirements.

Applying For a Degree

Degrees are granted at the end of Summer, Autumn, Winter and Spring terms. Students planning to graduate must request an Application for Degree at the Office of the Registrar two quarters prior to the quarter in which the degree is to be completed. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of this requirement, to initiate the request and to sign/return the application on time. 


Adding to a Degree Already Awarded

Top ^

Once an Otterbein Bachelor’s degree has already been awarded, students are not permitted to alter or enhance the transcript record at a later date by adding another major, a minor, repeating courses to improve the G.P.A., etc. Students may, however, earn a second Otterbein Bachelor’s degree as described below.


Earning a Second Bachelor’s Degree

Top ^

(all programs except PACE Liberal Studies Programs)

To earn a second Bachelor’s degree after the first has already been conferred, a student must complete:

  1. a minimum of 45 quarter hours in residence at Otterbein; CLEP, PEP, credit by other means of examination, proficiency tests, etc. may not be used to fulfill this requirement
  2. all requirements in the major; at least 15 quarter hours at the 300/400 level must be completed in residence
  3. two Integrative Studies courses in residence, one of which must be at the 300/400 level; this is applicable only to students who did not earn the first degree at Otterbein; those who did are exempt from this requirement
  4. all other degree requirements as published in the catalog in effect at the time of enrollment (foreign language, mathematics, etc.)

A Senior Year Experience class (SYE) is not required for second degree students.

If fewer than 45 quarter hours are needed to complete the major and other degree requirements, the remaining hours needed to reach 45 may consist of elective credit.

(PACE Liberal Studies Programs)

To earn a second Bachelor’s degree after the first has already been conferred, a student must complete:

  1. a minimum of 45 quarter hours in residence at Otterbein; CLEP, PEP, credit by other means of examination, proficiency tests, etc. may not be used to fulfill this requirement
  2. all requirements in the major; at least 30 quarter hours in the major (including 15 at the 300/400 level) must be completed in residence
  3. two Integrative Studies courses from the Liberal Studies core in residence
  4. foreign language 100 and 110 in transfer or in residence; or, language and culture 105 in residence
  5. COMM 361 in residence
  6. MATH 115 or 116 or 150 and 230 in transfer or in residence
  7. Senior Year Experience in residence

If fewer than 45 quarter hours are needed to complete the major and other degree requirements, the remaining hours needed to reach 45 may consist of elective credit.


Honors and Recognition

Top ^

Dean’s List

To be included on the Dean’s List, a student must complete at least 12 quarter hours in that term with a grade point average of at least 3.6. There is also an Annual Dean’s List which is published at the end of the Spring term grading period. Inclusion on the Annual Dean’s List requires a student to be on the Dean’s List for the Autumn, Winter, and Spring terms of the academic year just completed, or to complete at least 45 quarter hours in the academic year with a grade point average of at least 3.6. The Dean’s List is compiled by the Office of Academic Affairs.

The Honors Program

The Honors Program at Otterbein University is designed to provide intellectual stimulation and challenge for students with high academic ability. Students selected to participate in the program will have the privilege of attending courses each year that are designated for honors students only. The remainder of their curriculum will consist of courses selected from those available to all students. In this way the College hopes to promote a wide spectrum of experience while providing intellectual stimulation for gifted students.

While the primary benefit of participation in The Honors Program is the ability to enroll in advanced courses with other honors students and the preparation that these courses provide for intensive senior-level independent study, students in the program are also eligible for special housing and the Honors Program sponsors special programming and activities for honors students.

Participation in The Honors Program will be recognized permanently in two ways: Honors courses will be noted on academic transcript record so that potential employers or graduate school admission committees will recognize that level of work completed, and “With Honors,” will be noted on the diploma. The Honors designation will also be included in the commencement program and announced as the diploma is presented.

The Honors Program is coordinated by Dr. Cynthia Laurie-Rose of the Psychology Department.

The Distinction Program

The Distinction Program has a long and useful tradition at Otterbein University. The program involves the design and participation in an independent project within the student’s major field of study. The project is carried out in consultation with an advisory committee consisting of a primary project advisor, another member of the faculty chosen by the student in consultation with the advisor, and one member of the faculty appointed by the Distinction Committee.

An independent program of study offers the student an opportunity for personal growth within a chosen field of expertise that far exceeds that available in the classroom. A student in the program will perform independent scholarly activity as defined by the discipline. Students work closely with an advisor, an advisory committee, and prepare a written thesis. This is a collaborative effort that mimics the pursuit of an advanced degree and demonstrates the shared responsibility for learning that is so much a part of a liberal arts tradition.

To be eligible for the Distinction Program, a student must have completed 90 hours of study with a grade point average of 3.0 or above. All potential candidates are notified by the Chair of the Distinction Committee during winter quarter of the junior year. To enter the program the student chooses a faculty member to act as advisor for work in distinction, prepares a proposal, and attaches the proposal to a petition for work in distinction. The distinction project is completed during the senior year. Persons who complete the program to the satisfaction of their advisory committee will graduate “With Distinction.” These students will receive up to five hours of Independent Study with the grade of A and the words “With Distinction” will be included on the diploma and commencement program.

Interested students should contact program coordinator Dr. Michael Hoggarth at the Department of Life and Earth Sciences.

Graduation With Honors (Latin; The Honors Program; Distinction; Departmental)

Undergraduates may receive honors recognition at graduation based upon overall grade point average (Latin Honors) or participation in The Honors Program or participation in The Distinction Program or grade point average in the major.

For Latin honors, a student must have achieved the following final grade point average:

3.60 for Cum Laude
3.80 for Magna Cum Laude
3.95 for Summa Cum Laude

Latin Honors will be recorded on the permanent transcript record and on the diploma. It will be noted in the commencement program and announced as the recipient is presented the diploma.

For Honors Program recognition, a student must have completed the requirements of the honors program. Honors Program Honors will be recorded on the permanent transcript record and on the diploma. It will be noted in the commencement program and announced as the recipient is presented the diploma. A medal is worn at commencement.

To graduate With Distinction, a student must satisfactorily complete an approved program of independent study and research, submit a thesis and pass oral and written examinations on the field studied. With Distinction Honors will be recorded on the permanent transcript record and on the diploma. It will be noted in the commencement program and announced as the recipient is presented the diploma. A medal is worn at commencement.

For Departmental Honors, a student must have achieved a 3.70 grade point average for all courses in the major by the end of Winter Quarter. Students who are seeking a second Bachelor’s degree (first one already awarded) are not eligible for Departmental Honors. Departmental Honors will be noted in the commencement program. A pin is worn at commencement.


Course Prefix Translations

Top ^

Course Prefix Translations 


Off-Campus Programs

Top ^

Off-Campus Programs 


Academic Support Programs

Top ^

Academic Advising

Prior to enrolling at Otterbein, students are assigned academic advisors. The advising process is an ongoing series of consultations between the student and the advisor. Advising involves both the development and communication of accurate information regarding degree programs, courses, resources, academic policies/procedures and career opportunities intended to help students in achieving their educational goals. Both the advisee and the advisor share the responsibility of being active participants in the advising process. However, the student is responsible for making decisions regarding personal and educational goals and satisfying all graduation requirements.

Academic Support Center (including tutoring)

The Academic Support Center provides a variety of academic support services. The Writing Center provides drop-in consultation on writing projects in any subject area at any level. The Center, staffed by students and professionals, is open to all students who want to develop and refine their writing skills. The Math Lab provides assistance with math homework or concept review. It is staffed by student tutors who are available for extended hours each day. Content area peer tutoring on an individual basis is available in many other academic subjects. Noncredit individualized assistance from the professional staff is offered in areas such as time management, exam preparation, effective reading techniques, note-taking, and math study skills. Supplemental Instruction, a series of weekly review sessions, is offered in selected courses that are considered historically difficult. The Academic Support Center also facilitates special academic accommodations for students with disabilities.

Disability Services

The Office for Disability Services (ODS) at Otterbein is charged with ensuring that all qualified students with disabilities have equal access to an education and to campus life. This access is provided to students through the provision of legally mandated (Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act) services, accommodations, and advocacy. ODS provides services to students with obvious physical disabilities such as visual impairments, hearing impairments and mobility impairments as well as to students diagnosed with learning disabilities, Attention Deficit Disorder/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), medical diagnosis (Fibromyalgia, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, etc.) and psychiatric disorders. In order to receive accommodations, students must provide ODS with appropriate documentation of their disability. Types of accommodations that students may receive can include exam accommodations, note taking assistance, books in alternative format, and priority registration. ODS is located in room #2 on the second floor of the library in the Academic Support Center. For more information, contact 823-1618 or visit ODS on the web at www.otterbein.edu/ASC/DS/index.asp.

Additional support services may also be available through individual academic departments. Contact the specific department for assistance.

  Top ^